How to Hang Art

Hanging up artwork is an art in itself. There are so many ways to get it wrong or to personalise it. If the primary goal is merely to display the art in the best, most flattering way possible, some guidelines must be followed.

 

Sometimes, the best way to hang artwork is to have a professional on the job. Folks like www.thehandymanperth.com.au offer these services.

 

If you decide you want to handle this yourself, remember the “on centre” rule. This rule says that the middle of the artwork is always at the level of the average height of the human eye. This means that you are neither looking up or down when viewing it, providing a good view.

 

This is the standard used by galleries and museums. Unless you’re hanging them on top of taller features, like a fireplace, this is a good rule to adhere to in decorating.

 

The idea of eye-level height is pleasing but is a little lower than most people tend to use when hanging artwork on their own. No one is entirely sure why people hang it high. The excess means that the art is farther away from features like rugs and lighting.

 

At a proper height, everything blends. They “talk,” and there’s a sense of proximity that makes the whole room feel like it has a close relationship. This, in turn, makes everything feel much more cohesive.

 

There’s also the matter of harmony between the elements of the room. This is important. It gives the whole interior a unified feel, without anything appearing out of place. Everything in a room having the same midline generates a visual continuity.

 

Of course, the first step to take is marking the midline. Measure upwards from the floor until you have the right measurement. It’s 57″ or equivalent.

 

Find the centre of the artwork and align that to the midline you’ve determined. You probably need wire to do this, but just a small amount. Be sure to measure the tension of the cable itself, so you know how long it is when the art is hanging from it.

 

You’ll want to mark the spot where the hook goes, placing it an appropriate distance above the midline mark.

 

It’s a simple process, though it might take a bit of time if you’re not used to it. Once you know how things go, you can do it over and over again for each piece you find.

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